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  • ICAA Record ID
    841453
    TITLE
    [Anaida Hernández fue la segunda hija de cinco niños en Mayagüez, Puerto Rico...] / Angela M. Coldsmith, Carla M. Hernández, Nicole R. Kaufman, Coleen B. Mattews, Kathy Vega
    IN
    The latina artist : the response of the creative mind to gender, race, class and identity. -- New Brunswick, NJ : The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998.
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 30 - 32
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Coldsmith, Angela M., Carla M. Hernández, Nicole R. Kaufman, Coleen B. Mattews, and Kathy Vega. “ [Anaida Hernández fue la segunda hija de cinco niños en Mayagüez, Puerto Rico...].” In The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class and Identity, 30–32.  Exh. cat., New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998.


     
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    ADDITIONAL AUTHORS
Synopsis

In this essay, Angela Coldsmith examines the varied printmaking techniques of Anaida Hernández, and her work on behalf of women’s issues in her practices as an artist, activist, and educator. In particular, they note that Hernández organized an international exhibition of Latin American women artists in Puerto Rico, and created a traveling installation, Until Death Do Us Part (1994), that dealt with domestic violence against women. A second prominent subject matter in Hernández’s work concerns images of games in which spectators are involved in playing games within her installations. She notes that Hernández takes advantage of games as a metaphor to explore both power-relationships and human psychology. A third motif in her work is how language shapes identity, and the gap between visual and verbal means of expression constitutes. The author concludes by discussing how the themes of power, language, identity, and gaming are combined in Hernández’s large-scale installations.

Annotations

The catalogue, The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class, and Identity, where this essay was published, was the end product of an interdisciplinary class taught by professors Isabel Nazario and Judith Brodsky at Rutgers University, in 1997.The teachings intermingled methodologies from art history, Latin American studies, and women studies and involved students documenting the work of seven prominent Latina artists in residence: Catalina Parra, Magdalena Campos-Pons, Analee Davis, Anaida Hernández, Yolanda López, Coco Fusco, and Amelia Mesa-Bains.

This is the Spanish version of document 841430.

 

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez