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  • ICAA Record ID
    864025
    AUTHOR
    Delgado, Carlos
    TITLE
    Vea record del investigado en esta oficina : confidencial : Policia de Puerto Rico División de inteligencia. c. 26000, 30 de octubre de 1967 / Carlos Delgado
    DESCRIPTION
    4 leaves
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Typed sheet – Report
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    artists; policemen; reports
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

[This document is] a confidential report written by Officer Carlos Delgado for the Puerto Rican Intelligence Office, which includes personal information on the artist Lorenzo Homar, such as his address, employment, vehicle, political affiliations, and five interviews with people who know him. The report shows that he is a member of the Movimiento Pro Independencia [Pro Independence Movement] (MPI), and provides information on his wife and one of his two daughters. Delgado mentions that, although the subject has never shared his political views with his neighbors, he is nonetheless a “peaceful supporter of Puerto Rican independence.” The report quotes comments made by other tenants of the building where Homar lives, a woman who works at the Olympic swimming pool in San Juan where Homar created a mural, and an employee of the laminating shop at the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña [Puerto Rican Cultural Institute] (ICP) where the subject works.  

Annotations

The report mistakenly calls him “Nicolás” instead of “Lorenzo.” It is interesting to note that the report also includes the name and address of every informant or person interviewed by the detectives.

This document is part of what was called a “dossier,” which consisted of reports by the Negociado de Investigaciones Especiales de la Policía [Office of Special Police Investigations] of Puerto Rico in which (in this particular case) Lorenzo Homar was listed as a member of the Socialist Party. From 1948 until the 1980s, the intelligence office kept suspected subversives under surveillance and harassed those who sympathized with the independence movement. The police dossiers recorded their participation in events, such asmeetings, marches, protests, and revolts. In those days many people and organizations were victims of anonymous accusations and persecution for their political ideas.   

 

Researcher
Flavia Marichal Lugo
Team
Museo de Historia, Antropología y Arte, Universidad de Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico