Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    849142
    TITLE
    Tejano artists at Houston lighting and Power Company / Mimi Crossley
    IN
    Art in America (New York, USA). -- Vol. 65 (May-Jun. 1977)
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Reviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Crossley, Mimi. "Tejano artists at Houston lighting and Power Company." Art in America (New York, USA) 65 (May-Jun. 1977)
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Mimi Crossley begins her review of the Tejano Artists exhibition with a definition of the word Tejano [Texan] and uses this to differentiate Texas Chicano artists from the rest of the country. She argues that Tejano art is less political and more individualistic; less reactionary and more original artistically. She describes the work of several artists in the show, including Carmen Lomas Garza, Joe Rodriguez, and Enrique Campos. Crossley concludes with her assessment that Tejano art has less to do with the artist’s barrio [neighborhood] and instead is being made wherever Tejano artists find themselves.

Annotations

Mimi Crossley was the art critic for the Houston Post at the time this review was published in Art in America in 1977. The document is important for two reasons: first, it is one of the very few—if not the first—reviews of a Chicano art exhibition for a major mainstream art publication; and second, Crossley’s use of the term “Post-Chicano” to describe Tejano art, especially at this early date in the development of Chicano art, also makes it a seminal record in the historiography of Latino art. Also noteworthy is how she positions all the artists into the standard art historical rubric, describing their art in terms of Surrealism, super realism, and Impressionism. Though she delivers an overall favorable review, in a very telling sentence Crossley lauds an artist for being a “hard worker helping barrio children” as opposed to being “a flamboyant radical organizer,” as if that had any bearing in an art exhibition review.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Originally published in Art in America, 1977. Courtesy BMI Media Inc., New York, NY