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  • ICAA Record ID
    848970
    AUTHOR
    Lindsay, Arturo
    TITLE
    Mestizaje and the postmodern Latino aesthetic / Arturo Lindsay
    IN
    Ceremony of spirit : nature and memory in contemporary latino art. --San Francisco, CA : The Mexican Museum, 1993.
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 42-45
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Lindsay, Arturo. "Mestizaje and the postmodern Latino aesthetic." In Ceremony of spirit : nature and memory in contemporary latino art, 42-45. Exh. cat. San Francisco, CA : The Mexican Museum, 1993.
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Synopsis

In this essay, Arturo Lindsay documents the confluence of Post-modernism in the U.S. and the mestizaje [racial and cultural intermingling] of Latinos in order to create a “Latino aesthetic”—one that is grounded in syncretic spiritual beliefs. He describes the influence of Afro-Latino religious practices on the art of Ana Mendieta (1948–1985) and Juan Boza (1941–1991). Moreover, Lindsay chronicles the major events of the Chicano Movement such as the United Farm Workers boycotts, and relates how Chicano artists combine Catholic Church images with indigenous iconography to create what he terms a “chicanocentric mestizo aesthetic.” He concludes with an observation that Latino art and aesthetics—by means of its syncretism and mestizaje—will continue to be important sources for scholarly attention and artistic review.

Annotations

Arturo Lindsay describes himself as an “artist-scholar who conducts ethnographic research on African spiritual and aesthetic retentions in contemporary Latin American cultures.” Originally from Panama, Lindsay is a professor of art and art history in the Department of Art at Spellman College in Atlanta, Georgia. This essay was included in the exhibition catalog Ceremony of Spirit: Nature and Memory in Contemporary Latino Art, which was curated by Amalia Mesa-Bains for the Mexican Museum in San Francisco in 1993. Lindsay created an installation for the exhibition based on the Santeria orishá [spirit] of Obatalá. Thus, the essay is unique in his dual perspective: as a scholar, Lindsay contextualizes the little-known spiritual-based art practice of other artists, while though not directly, this essay also elucidates his artwork as one of the participating artists.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of Arturo Lindsay, Atlanta, GA