Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    845662
    TITLE
    La raza silkscreen center / Ralph Maradiaga
    IN
    The Fifth Sun : Contemporary/Traditional Chicano & Latino Art. -- Berkeley, CA : University Art Museum, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 1977
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 35, 37 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Maradiaga, Ralph. "La Raza Silkscreen Center." In The Fifth Sun: Contemporary/ Traditional Chicano and Latino Art, 35, 37. Berkeley, CA: University Art Museum, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 1977.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This essay by artist and guest curator, Ralph Maradiaga is a collection of short profiles of three important centers of Latino and Chicano art in San Francisco: La Raza Silkscreen Center, the Galería de la Raza, and the Mexican Museum. Each emphasizes their community impact with particular regard to educational and cultural programs that promote collectivity and involvement. La Raza Silkscreen Center produces posters that reflect the heritage of La Raza (defined as including all of Latin America) and encourage pride in its artistic and cultural history. Under the supervision of co-director René Yañez, Galería de la Raza aided the development of the Mission District Mural Movement as well as subsequent large-scale projects, specifically billboards. The Mexican Museum is described as exhibiting works that represent five areas of Mexican art and promoting community participation through educational tours and festivals.

Annotations

Ralph Maradiaga (1934–85) was an artist, filmmaker, and co-director of the Galeria de la Raza in San Francisco. This section of short organizational profiles was included in the catalogue accompanying the 1977 group exhibition, The Fifth Sun, guest curated by Maradiaga and held at the University Art Museum on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. The brief profiles provide a comprehensive understanding of the mission, programs, and contributions of each art organization and also generally document an important period of Chicano/Latino art in the San Francisco Bay Area at its height in artistic activism, public support, and involvement with a number of art organizations in the late-1970s. Equally important, the exhibition was also one of the first regional exhibitions curated by a Chicano at a major mainstream museum.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA