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  • ICAA Record ID
    842081
    TITLE
    Catalina Parra / Carmen Bardeguez- Brown, Wilnelya Bosques, Angelica M. Irizarry, Mauren León, Claudio Mir
    IN
    The latina artist : the response of the creative mind to gender, race, class and identity. -- New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998.
     
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 53-54
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Bardeguez- Brown, Carmen, Wilnelya Bosques, Angelica M. Irizarry, Mauren León, and Claudio Mir. “Catalina Parra.”  In The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class and Identity, 53–54.  Exh. cat., New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In this essay, Carmen Bardeguez-Brown weighs the influence of the Berlin Dadaists (1918–22) on photomontage artist Catalina Parra. Of Chilean descent, Parra went to college in Germany where she was exposed to Dada art in 1968. She was drawn to the manner in which the Dadaists appropriated images from mass media sources and exposed manipulation of public opinion as well as expressed dissent from the Nazi Party. Parra used her artwork to protest the dictatorial Pinochet regime in Chile (1973-90). Moving to New York City in the late-1970s, she continued to make politically charged photomontages.The author comments on Parra’s incorporation of sewing into her prints. Parra attributes her interest in sewing to the legend of the Imbuche people (from Chile) who sewed their orifices closed to prevent evil. Evidently, the usage of stitching within her imagery is intended as a protective measure.

Annotations

The catalogue, The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class, and Identity, where this essay was published, was the end product of an interdisciplinary class taught by professors Isabel Nazario and Judith Brodsky at Rutgers University, in 1997.The teachings intermingled methodologies from art history, Latin American studies, and women studies and involved students documenting the work of seven prominent Latina artists in residence: Catalina Parra, Magdalena Campos-Pons, Analee Davis, Anaida Hernández, Yolanda López, Coco Fusco, and Amelia Mesa-Bains.

This is the Spanish version of document 842058.

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez