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  • ICAA Record ID
    841940
    TITLE
    [Coco Fusco es una de las figuras más visibles, vocales y agitadoras en el ámbito artístico latino...] / Mary Ellen Croteau, Ayodamola Okunseinde, Denis M. Rampilla
    IN
    The latina artist : the response of the creative mind to gender, race, class and identity. -- New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University fo New Jersey, 1998
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 23 - 25
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Croteau, Mary Ellen, Ayodamola Okunseinde, and Denis M. Rampilla “[Coco Fusco es una de las figuras más visibles, vocales y agitadoras en el ámbito artístico latino...].” In The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class and Identity, 23–25. Exh. cat., New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University fo New Jersey, 1998.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

The authors of this essay describe Coco Fusco as one of the most highly visible and vocal members of the Latino artistic community in the United States. The author, Mary Ellen Croteau, provides an overview of Fusco’s family background and academic training, and discusses her concerns with addressing ethnicity, race, gender, and language in her performance work. In particular, the author observes that Fusco’s performances and writings feature how women and non-Western people have been typecast as primitive and/or exotic beings in Western culture and art. Fusco’s performances are described as employing humor, parody, and camp to mock the superficial representations of women and non-Western people in the media. The author examines several of Fusco’s performances, including Two Undiscovered Amerindians, wherein Fusco and Mexican-born artist Guillermo Gómez-Pena displayed themselves in a cage.

Annotations

The catalogue, The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class, and Identity, where this essay was published, was the end product of an interdisciplinary class taught by professors Isabel Nazario and Judith Brodsky at Rutgers University, in 1997.The teachings intermingled methodologies from art history, Latin American studies, and women studies and involved students documenting the work of seven prominent Latina artists in residence: Catalina Parra, Magdalena Campos-Pons, Analee Davis, Anaida Hernández, Yolanda López, Coco Fusco, and Amelia Mesa-Bains.

This is the Spanish version of document 841409.

 

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez