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  • ICAA Record ID
    841346
    TITLE
    [Nueve años después que Castro vino al poder, la artista María Magdalena Pons...] / Adrianne M. Dwyer, José L. González, Thomas S. Hoffmann, Jennifer L. Katz, Susan Keller, Johanna Malaret, Shannon Peck
    IN
    The Latina Artist : The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class and Identity. -- New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 9 - 10
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Dwyer, Adrianne M., José L. González, Thomas S. Hoffmann, Jennifer L. Katz, Susan Keller, Johanna Malaret, and Shannon Peck. “[Nueve años después que Castro vino la poder, la artista María Magdalena Pons...].” In The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class and Identity, 9–10. Exh. cat., New Brunswick, NJ: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1998.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

The author of this essay, Adrianne Dwyer, discusses the autobiographical references found in Magdalena Campos-Pons’s work that relate to her Afro-Cuban background, specifically the spiritual tradition of Santeria. Campos-Pons explains that her employment of Santeria symbols is intended to signify cultural hybridism rather than religious sentiments. The artist declares she has been influenced by minimalism in the way in which she displays her work, but that she rejects doctrines that limit the meaning and appreciation of art to formalist perspectives. Dwyer examines how Campos-Pons addresses the theme of psychological displacement and geographical dislocation by installing artworks in corners. She maintains that corners are crossroads; corner spaces have double significations of putting a subject in an immobile situation but also opening them up to exploring the intersection of different paths.

Annotations

The catalogue, The Latina Artist: The Response of the Creative Mind to Gender, Race, Class, and Identity, where this essay was published, was the end product of an interdisciplinary class taught by professors Isabel Nazario and Judith Brodsky at Rutgers University, in 1997.The teachings intermingled methodologies from art history, Latin American studies, and women studies and involved students documenting the work of seven prominent Latina artists in residence: Catalina Parra, Magdalena Campos-Pons, Analee Davis, Anaida Hernández, Yolanda López, Coco Fusco, and Amelia Mesa-Bains.

This is the Spanish version of document 841133.

 

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez