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  • ICAA Record ID
    841326
    AUTHOR
    Collazo, Dori
    TITLE
    Diary of a collective / Dori Collazo
    IN
    Comadres: A Collective Environmental Exhibit by Ten Women Artists. -- New York, NY: El Museo del Barrio, 1980
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Collazo, Dori. “Diary of a collective.” In Comadres: A Collective Environmental Exhibit by Ten Women Artists. Exh. cat., New York, NY: El Museo del Barrio, 1980.
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

This catalogue for the 1990 exhibition, Comadres: A Collective Environmental Exhibit by Ten Women Artists, wasdesigned as a folder containing loose sheets of handwritten minutes taken throughout the different meetings in preparation of the Comadrescollective’s environmental exhibition at El Museo del Barrio. As explained in the introduction by Dori Collazo, the main rationale for their collective was to describe the experiences of women artists and their need to express feelings and thoughts through a common creative bond. Each of the dated minutes includes the goals of the specific works to be developed, and themes to be explored in the show, along with a general agenda with a step-by-step breakdown by deadlines. One explicit aim in providing the behind-the-scenes texts was to leave a trace of inside knowledge as to the process, planning, and struggles that become the actual product of an art collective. The diary acts as a record of their growth as individuals and their shared determination to make a statement.

Annotations

Comadres was an art collective comprise of: Nydza M. Bajandas, Marta León-Bonilla, Dori Collazo, Maria Elena Cortés, Maritza Dávila, Aurora Dias Jorgensen, Susan Ackoff Ortega, Wanda Maria Quiñones, Doris Cordero Ramirez, and Diana Rivera. There were ten women artists; one of them was Brazilian, and the rest were born in Puerto Rico or in New York, from parents of Puerto Rican descent. Most of them had formal academic degrees in the visual arts or the social sciences, and were activists within the New York City art milieu of the 1970s and early-1980s.

Researcher
Libertad Guerra
Credit
© 1991 Provided courtesy of the Private Archives of David R. White, Puerto Rico Dream, Hopkinton, NH.
Courtesy of Susana Torruella Leval, New York, NY.
Reproduced with permission of El Museo del Barrio, New York, NY.