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  • ICAA Record ID
    804309
    AUTHOR
    Monferrer, Ulises
    TITLE
    Alegorías de la opulencia y la miseria : el primer fresco de Ángel Zárraga pintado en México / por Ulises Monferrer
    IN
    Así (México, D. F.). -- Nov. 28, 1942
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 12-14 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Monferrer, Ulises. "Alegorías de la opulencia y la miseria: El primer fresco de Ángel Zárraga pintado en México." Así (Mexico City), November 28, 1942, 12-14.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
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Synopsis

This short article covers the opinions of the painter Ángel Zárraga on mural painting, given his recent work decorating the bar of the Club de Banqueros at Edificio Guardiola in the historic center of the Mexican capital. This is the first fresco he has executed since his return to Mexico from France in 1941, after living in Europe for almost 40 years. The article describes the four symbolic figures that appear in Zárraga’s composition:Fortuna, Dánae, Abundancia and Miseria  [Fortune, Dánae, Plethora and Wretchedness], focusing on the way they are colored. The figures create a contrast with the overall spectrum of the room’s architecture: "The colors are harmonious but bold."

Annotations

Ángel Zárraga (1886-1946) has just completed the decoration of the Club de Banqueros, located on one of the top floors of the new building in the capital, the Edificio Guardiola. This building, which is an important example of Art Deco architecture, houses the Banco de México. The composition consists of four female nude figures set in an idealized natural environment, accessible to the “cosmopolitan” public that would be visiting the club. According to Monferrer, the least idealized of the images is Abundancia, in which the painter “alludes to . . . our mestizo women,” with the familiar association between the feminine and the “fruits of Mother Earth.” Earlier in the year, on the ground floor of the same building, Jorge González Camarena (1908-80) painted the work La vida [Life], made up of two parts: “male” and “female.” As the titles indicate, these works, also nude, were part of a realistic aesthetic trend that led to more than one adverse criticism. The negative comments by conservatives linked to the Edificio Guardiola cited moral objections to the works. Unlike the Zárraga paintings, created for a private audience, the works by González Camarena were exhibited in a public space, on the upper wall where the main elevators were located.

Researcher
Diana Briuolo : CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional