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  • ICAA Record ID
    803125
    TITLE
    Introduction / Sybil Venegas
    IN
    Image & Identity: Recent Chicana Art from "La Reina del Pueblo de los Angeles de la Porcincula".  Art of Greater Los Angeles in the 1990s, Vol II, No. 2.  Los Angeles, CA: Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University, 1990.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Venegas, Sybil. "Introduction" In Image & Identity: Recent Chicana Art from "La Reina del Pueblo de los Angeles de la Porcincula".  Art of Greater Los Angeles in the 1990s, Vol II, No. 2.  Los Angeles, CA: Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University, 1990.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This essay by Sybil Venegas was the introduction to the catalogue of the 1990 exhibition, Image and Identity,which was curated by him and held at the Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California. According to Venegas, identity and image have been at the core of Chicano art. She curated this exhibition to explore the ways in which gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and resistance to historical subjugation by both Chicano and Anglo males have influenced Chicana art. Venegas included the work of five Chicana artists who have distinct artistic styles, yet are each involved in the Chicano art movement in Los Angeles: Dolores Guerrero Cruz, Barbara Carrasco, Diane Gamboa, Margaret Garcia, and Laura Aguilar. Venegas’s introduction also includes mini-biographies and a discussion of artwork by each Chicana artist.

Annotations

Sybil Venegas is one the first art historians to historicize Chicana art. In addition, as one of the few Chicanas involved in art history, she was in a unique position to dispel some of the prevalent gender stereotypes and to put Chicana art on an equal scholarly footing as mainstream art. This introductory essay was for an exhibition that served as a complementary exhibition to the historically-based Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (CARA) at UCLA. Focusing on more recent artwork, Venegas crafted an exhibition that allowed the public to view more complex and current pieces by local Chicana artists, some of which were represented with earlier works in the CARA show. As such, the essay becomes a valuable contribution to a more comprehensive understanding of Chicana art in relationship to mainstream art, and also within the context of Chicano art.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Reproduced with permission of the private archives of Sybil Venegas, Los Angeles, CA