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  • ICAA Record ID
    802676
    TITLE
    Juan Sánchez / Dore Ashton
    IN

    Juan Sanchez: Printed Convictions, Printed and Related Works on Paper. Juan Sanchez: Convicciones Grabadas, Grabadas y Obras en Papel.  Jersey City, NJ: Jersey City Museum, 1998. 

    DESCRIPTION
    p. [6]-8
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
     Ashton, Dore. "Juan Sánchez." In Juan Sanchez : Printed convictions = Convicciones grabadas : prints and related works on paper = grabados y obras en papel, [6]-8 . Jersey City, NJ : Jersey City Museum, 1998.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Art critic Dore Ashton praises artist Juan Sánchez for employing a visual language that conveys the complexity of his experience as an Afro-Puerto Rican who was born and raised in New York City. She believes that Sánchez’s artistic success stems from staying close to the themes of his life while framing their significance in a sociopolitical context. Ashton observes that key phrases in Sanchez’s vocabulary include: Catholic imagery, Taíno petroglyphs, the sacred heart, Santeria objects, poetry fragments, newspaper clippings, family photos, and images of historical figures. The critic finds that Sánchez uses color symbolism and carefully layers his images, sometimes tearing them or placing them upside down to invest them with different meanings. The essay concludes with a close reading of the following works: La Lucha Continua (1986); Todavía Hay Boricuas (1992); Para Don Pedro (1992); and Corazones y Flores Para Julia (1994).

Annotations

Juan Sánchez (b. 1954) is a painter, printmaker, and professor of fine art at Hunter College, New York City. Born in 1954, Sánchez was a young artist-activist during the emergence of the Puerto Rican empowerment movement in New York, which flourished in the 1970s. Sánchez’s artwork and curatorial projects address sociopolitical issues, such as Puerto Rican independence, freedom for political prisoners, and neocolonialism in the Americas. In addition to creating his own work, Juan Sánchez has organized several group exhibitions that draw attention to the colonial status of Puerto Rico, and to its prisoners of wars incarcerated in the United States. These exhibitions include: Huellas: Avanzada Estética Por La Liberacion Nacional (1988); Remerica!Amerika (1992); and The Puerto Rican Equation (1998).

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez
Credit
Courtesy of Dore Ashton, New York, NY
Location
Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College, New York