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  • ICAA Record ID
    802646
    TITLE
    Juan Sánchez Rican/structs / Alejandro Anreus
    IN

    Juan Sanchez : Printed convictions = Convicciones grabadas : prints and related works on paper = grabados y obras en papel. Jersey City, NJ: Jersey City Museum, 1998.

     

    DESCRIPTION
    p. 11 - 12
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Anreus, Alejandro. "Juan Sánchez Rican/structs."In Juan Sanchez : Printed convictions = Convicciones grabadas : prints and related works on paper = grabados y obras en papel, 11-12. New Jersey: Jersey City Museum, 1998.
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Curator Alejandro Anreus gives a close reading of an ongoing series by Juan Sánchez: “Rican/struction.” The title “Rican/struction” refers to a term that salsa musician Ray Barretto coined to describe processes utilized by Diasporic Puerto Ricans to suture together their fragmented sense of national identity. Discussing five works within the series, Anreus comments on the symbolism of the juxtaposition of images by Sánchez as well as the intensity of his colors. Struck by Sánchez’s manner of placing photographs of contemporary Puerto Ricans next to reproductions of classic Puerto Rican paintings, like Our Daily Bread by Ramon Frade (1905), Anreus writes that such works remind the spectator of continuities between past and present with regard to the colonial oppression that Puerto Ricans suffer. Anreus concludes that Sánchez belongs in the company of socially engaged artists of the Americas, such as: José Clemente Orozco, Francisco Oller, Rafael Tufiño, José Alicea, Lorenzo Homar, and Antonio Berni.

Annotations

Juan Sánchez (b. 1954) is a painter, printmaker, and professor of fine art at Hunter College, New York City. Born in 1954, Sánchez was a young artist-activist during the emergence of the Puerto Rican empowerment movement in New York, which flourished in the 1970s. Sánchez’s artwork and curatorial projects address sociopolitical issues, such as Puerto Rican independence, freedom for political prisoners, and neocolonialism in the Americas. Huellas was the first major group exhibition that Sánchez organized to draw attention to the colonial status of Puerto Rico. Additional exhibitions include: Remerica!Amerika (1992), and The Puerto Rican Equation (1998).

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez
Credit
Courtesy of Alejandro Anreus, Roselle Park, NJ
Location
Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College, New York