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  • ICAA Record ID
    802536
    TITLE
    An overview of the converging history of graphic artists from the island and El Barrio, Spanish Harlem
    IN

    Puerto Rican Graphic Arts: From the Island to El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, 1949-1985.  New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1998

    DESCRIPTION
    p. 2 - 6: ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Nazario, Isabel. “An Overview of the Converging History of Graphic Artists from the Island and El Barrio, Spanish Harlem.” In Puerto Rican Graphic Arts: From the Island to El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, 1949-1985, 2–6. New Brunswick, New Jersey: The Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1998.
     
     
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Curator Isabel Nazario compares the emergence of independent Puerto Rican printmaking collectives in New York during the 1970s to the government sponsored graphic art workshops that were instituted in Puerto Rico in the 1950s. She notes that Puerto Ricans experienced sociopolitical upheaval during both eras in different places, and that artists addressed these changes via the production of prints and posters distributed to local communities. Additionally, artists were engaged in educating local communities in printmaking techniques, thus broadening the field of producers and consumers of poster art. Nazario finds that the presence of Island-based master printmakers—Rafael Tufiño and Carlos Osorio, in New York City during the late 1960s and early 1970s—enabled a younger generation of Puerto Rican artists in the city to obtain firsthand knowledge of the Puerto Rican printmaking tradition. She notes that both Tufiño and Osorio together with Marcos Dimas, Adrian Garcia, and Manuel Otero founded Taller Boricua, the first community-based Puerto Rican artist collective in New York. The intergenerational composition of Taller Boricua made this group uniquely suited to extending Puerto Rican graphic arts production to mainland United States. Nazario additionally notes that Puerto Rican printmakers saw themselves as following in the footsteps of the Taller de Gráfica Popular in Mexico.

Annotations

Curator Isabel Nazario worked at El Museo del Barrio in the early 1980s, and also participated in Taller Boricua workshops. Nazario organized the catalogue and exhibition, Puerto Rican Graphic Arts: From the Island to El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, 1949–1985, to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Spanish-American War, after which Puerto Rico became a colony of the United States. Although the essay is generally accurate, Nazario misidentifies the artist Manuel Otero as a writer.

Researcher
Yasmin Ramirez
Location
Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College, New York