Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

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Synopsis

This group of texts describes an exhibition of Augustín V. Casasola’s photographs—and the public programs that accompanied it—organized by Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH) and mounted at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1976. In “Impressions of the Exhibit,” Peter Pero ponders the images and how they portrayed the history of the Mexican Revolution, including those depicting society under Porfirio Diaz, the female soldaderas of the revolution, and battle scenes. He marvels over Casasola’s use of the cumbersome box camera to document dangerous scenes of engagement such as gun battles; and he writes that the exhibition offered a lesson on the pitfalls and promises of revolution. In “Impressions of the Program,” Mary Kay Vaughan mentions, in turn, the series of concerts and lectures and film program that accompanied the exhibition and were held at the newly established Centro Cultural Rafael Cintron Ortiz. Including concerts of “corridos” and classical music, films by Sergei Eisenstein and Raymundo Gleyzer, and lectures on Pancho Villa, these programs featured a wide range of local and national artists, academics, and community activists.

Annotations

These texts, which appeared in the summer 1979 issue of Abrazo [Hug], describe an exhibition organized by Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH) of Agustín V. Casasola’s memorable photographs of the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Mexposición II: Images of the Revolución, held in November 1976 at the Chicago Circle galleries of the University of Illinois at Chicago, was also accompanied by films, lectures, and concerts about the Mexican Revolution. This exhibition and accompanying programs constituted part of an effort by Chicago-based Chicano and Mexican artists to bring works from the Mexican artistic tradition to a general public north of the United States-Mexico border. 

Researcher
Victor Sorell; Harper Montgomery, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA
Credit
Courtesy of MARCH Abrazo Press, MARCH Inc.,Chicago, IL