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  • ICAA Record ID
    800931
    TITLE
    Irradiador N. 1: Revista de vanguardia / Dirección de Manuel Maples Arce y Fermín Revueltas
    IN
    Fermín Revueltas constructor de espacios. -- Mexico City: RM/INBA, 2002
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 48
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Other
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Maples Arce, Manuel and Fermín Revueltas. "Irradiador N. 1: Revista de vanguardia." In Fermín Revueltas constructor de espacios, edited by Carla Zurián, 48. Mexico City: RM/INBA, 2002.
    ADDITIONAL AUTHORS
Synopsis

Irradiador magazine—subtitled, “Avant-garde magazine: an international project devoted to the new aesthetic, directed by Manuel Maples Arce & Fermín Revueltas”—was published in Mexico City in 1923. El restorán [The Restaurant], a drawing by Revueltas, illustrates the cover of the first issue. In the magazine’s first essay, titled “Irradiación inaugural,”  which is presented in the form of a manifesto, the Estridentistas declare themselves to be “noviangularmente irradiales” [neo-angularly irradiant]; they praise the urban aesthetics and advise the reader, whom they address as one stricken with a social disease, to consult Dr. The Unbelievable in order to have an “irradioscopy,” and undergo “Stridentotherapy.” This first essay includes a poem jointly written by Diego Rivera and the writer and poet Julio Torri in the form of an advertisement for “Stridentina,” as an infallible cure against academic, conservative intellectuality. 

Annotations

Irradiador was the first Estridentista magazine to experiment with advertising and used photography as well as an extension of the avant-garde language; even Edward Weston (1886–1958) was among its contributors. The two subsequent issues of the magazine appeared in October and November 1923. 

Calligraphic poems, like the one by Gonzalo Deza Méndez published in the second issue of Irradiador magazine, were closer to the Frenchman Guillaume Apollinaire’s "calligrammes." The one by Diego Rivera (1886–1957) and Julio Torri (1889–1970) sketches forms with words that are seasoned with a sense of irony to produce the confrontational language against the conservative groups and turn the poem into a sort of ideographical manifesto.    

Researcher
Francisco Reyes Palma
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Biblioteca Justino Fernández del Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México