Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    799652
    TITLE
    Las ideas y las formas : Fantasía y realidad / por Jorge J. Crespo de la Serna
    IN
    Excélsior : El periódico de la vida nacional (México, D. F., México). -- Mar. 12, 1950)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 7, 11 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Crespo de la Serna, Jorge. "Las ideas y las formas: Fantasía y realidad." Excélsior: El periódico de la vida nacional (Mexico City), March 12, 1950.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

The way Crespo de la Serna sees Leonora Carrington is that, in spite of being English-born, her artistic temperament is not of a kind to be circumscribed or limited by a specific geographic environment. Hence, “the world in which she breathes has an extraordinary breadth.” According to the critic, the artist’s work is made up of present-day cosmic fragments, memories of past lives and tangible visions revealed in a vigil or a dream. Her artwork mixes several visual elements from the objective world that are transported, through imagination and fantasy, to a world of her own concoction. There we find order and balance—of forces, forms and ideas, and poetic images—which come to seem perfectly logical and real. In Crespo de la Serna’s opinion, one of the outstanding characteristics of Carrington’s work is her spiritual strength. Since this painter is able to solve any problem of form or representation of concepts, each of her works reveals all her personal obsessions.

Annotations

This review of an exhibition of Leonora Carrington (1917-2011) at the Galería Clardecor shows the interest the English Surrealist artist’s work was stirring up among Mexican critics. The critics’ perceptions particularly emphasized the dreamlike nature of her motifs. This personal search for fantasy lands, dreams, the artist’s interior, seemed novel on the canvases of both Carrington and the Spanish artist Remedios Varo (1908-63). However, it was harder for such elements to gain acceptance at the core of the work of local painters. In this regard, we must take into consideration the discussion about the clearly European nature of the roots of Surrealism and its “forced” adaptation in the Mexican art milieu.

Researcher
Mireida Velázquez : CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Courtesy of Ady Crespo Weber, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional