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  • ICAA Record ID
    799527
    TITLE
    La acción : he aquí el programa / [Dr. Atl]
    IN
    La Vanguardia : es el diario de la Revolución (Orizaba, Veracruz, México). -- May. 26, 1915
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 4-5
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Dr. Atl [Gerardo Murillo]. "La acción: He aquí el programa." La Vanguardia: es el diario de la Revolución (Orizaba), May 26, 1915.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Signed in September 1914, the short article by Dr. Atl—then director of the Academia de San Carlos—states his opinion about the direction the Academy should take as the Mexican revolution raged around it. “The dilemma I am facing is this: either propose that the Academy be closed or turn it into a workshop capable of producing work, like all the industrial workshops of our era and like all the art workshops in every period in which art has flourished vigorously. . . . My decision is to turn the Academy into a workshop.” Among the proposals to be carried out by the artists under this new approach will be to “close the Teatro Nacional, and promote the Mexican Republic first and foremost, so the schools will provide the children a beautiful place in which they may learn to read.”

Annotations

The newspaper, La Vanguardia, had a short life, since it was published in Orizaba (Veracruz) only from April 21 to June 11, 1915. The newspaper provided news on the general situation on different fronts with constitutional claims along with international political information. It also offered theater criticism, literary news and ideological articles written by Dr. Atl (1875-1964), who was the publisher and founder of the newspaper. In addition, La Vanguardia placed a high priority on illustrations, outstanding among which were caricatures by José Clemente Orozco (1883-1949). 

Dr. Atl is considered the main promoter of the postrevolutionary muralist movement and it was from that perspective that he called for closure of the Teatro Nacional (now the Palacio de Bellas Artes). Saturnino Herrán was the artist designing the decorations for the Teatro Nacional at the time. The artists who served under the Mexican President Venustiano Carranza (1917-20) believed that the Revolution required literature and artwork of a combative nature and they considered themselves artist/soldiers. 

Researcher
Diana Briuolo
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit

Location
Biblioteca Nacional de Antropología e Historia “Dr. Eusebio Dávalos Hurtado”