Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

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  • ICAA Record ID
    796281
    TITLE
    El Grito
    IN
    El Grito : A Journal of Mexican American Thought (Berkeley, CA, USA). --- Vol. 2, no. 3 (Spring, 1969)
    DESCRIPTION
    ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English; Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Anthologies
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    El Grito: A Journal of Mexican American Thought (Berkeley, CA, USA), vol. 2, no.3 (Spring 1969).
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This document encompasses the entire special issue of the journal El Grito, which consisted of statements and artwork by five Mexican-American artists from the San Francisco Bay Area, in California. The issue begins with an introduction by one of the journal editors and includes five numbered sections, named “Portfolios.” The artists represented are: Manuel Hernandez Trujillo, José Montoya, Malaquías Montoya, Esteban Villa, and René Yañez. As explained in the bilingual introduction, the issue was intended to recognize the “timeless” aspect of the “art of the people” and pay tribute to community-based artists.

Annotations

The essay is represented in its entirety in acknowledgment of the intent of the special issue, which was to honor the individual artists included for their commitment to an art of and for the people. It is significant that this is the first issue of El Grito—which typically focused on “Mexican American thought,”—to feature Chicano art, and to dedicate a substantial number of pages to reproducing artwork that is now largely lost or destroyed. It also serves to document the close relationship between Chicano literature and art from the very beginning of the Chicano Movement. The issue is also noteworthy in that, although not stated, all but one of the artists represented (José Montoya) were members of the seminal artist collective, Mexican American Liberation Art Front (MALAF), which was active in the late 1960s in Oakland, California. The statements and artwork reveal their individual artistic styles and media and also attest to the unifying belief in the goals of the Chicano Movement that brought them together as a collective.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA