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  • ICAA Record ID
    796259
    TITLE
    Ester Hernández / Amalia Mesa-Bains
    IN
    Galería de la Raza/Studio 24: Artist Monograph Series (San Francisco, CA) . --  No. 1 (1988)
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Mesa-Bains, Amalia . "Ester Hernández." Galería de la Raza/Studio 24: Artist Monograph Series (San Francisco, CA) 1 (1988)
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

This essay by artist, scholar, and cultural critic Amalia Mesa-Bains explores the personal, cultural, and social histories that have influenced Chicana artist, Ester Hernández. The author begins with an analysis of one of Hernández’s most famous images, Sun Mad (1981), and goes on to discuss critical themes of Hernández’s body of work, including memory, family, poverty, feminism, and Chicano cultural heritage. Mesa-Bains addresses Hernandez’ numerous artistic influences such as her association with the Mujeres Muralistas. The author identifies a desire for social change and cultural pride as the driving force behind Hernandez’s art. The article ends with a brief biography of the artist, detailing events of her childhood, her family’s social involvement, her education, and her professional career.

Annotations

Amalia Mesa-Bains is an artist and cultural critic, who wrote extensively on Chicano/Latino art.

This essay was prepared for the “Artist Monograph Series” published by San Francisco’s Galeria de la Raza. Envisioned as a stand-alone piece—even though at many times it was published in conjunction with an exhibition—the series sought to fill the gap in scholarly writing on Chicano/a artists and their production. Mesa-Bains’ monograph on Ester Hernandez was the first to situate her prints within the context of Chicano/a activist art, especially in relation to the struggle of farm workers and representation of Chicanas.

Researcher
Tere Romo.
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the private archives of Dr. Amalia Mesa-Bains, San Juan Bautista, CA