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  • ICAA Record ID
    796051
    TITLE
    Across the street : Self-Help Graphics and Chicano art in Los Angeles / Margarita Nieto
    IN
    Across the Street. -- Laguna Beach, CA : Laguna Art Museum, 1977
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 21-[37] : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Nieto, Margarita . "Across the street : Self-Help Graphics and Chicano art in Los Angeles. " In Across the street : Self-Help Graphics and Chicano art in Los Angeles, p. 21-[37. Exh. cat., Laguna Beach, CA : Laguna Art Museum, 1977
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In this essay, art historian Margarita Nieto critiques the tendency to trace the genealogy of Chicano art to Mexican art. She locates the roots of the Chicano art movement and the art organizations that emerged within it to the countercultural expressions and political activism of the 1960s. She stresses some of the key events of this time, emphasizing activism among Chicano students and educators in California, and among the students’ movement in Mexico City. Nieto provides a survey of the Chicano art organizations and arts publications founded in Los Angeles from 1969 to the mid-1970s. Her discussion of Chicano arts collectives in the 1960s and 1970s focuses on a comparison of Los Four and Asco. Nieto also provides an in-depth account of the history of Self-Help Graphics in Los Angeles.

Annotations

Margarita Nieto is the first art historian to argue that American influences were strong in the work of Los Angeles Chicano artists, citing the Los Four artist collective as a prime example. She credits this influence for their acceptance by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to exhibit their work in 1974. This same recognition of American art connections and influences in Chicano art is also applied to a lengthy discussion of the Los Angeles cultural center and atelier, Self Help Graphics (SHG). The essay includes color reproductions of SHG prints by the following artists: Juana Alicia, Alfredo de Batuc, Gronk, Yolanda Gonzalez, Robert Delgado, Armando Norte, Eloy Torres, Alex Alferov, Leo Limón, Diana Gamboa, Dolores Guerrero-Cruz, Patssi Valdez, Peter Sparrow, Yreina Cervantes, David Botello, Sister Karen Boccalero, Guillermo Bert, Michael Amescua, and José Antonio Aguirre.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the private archives of Margarita Nieto, Ph. D., Los Angeles, CA.
Courtesy of the Austin Museum of Art, Austin, TX