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  • ICAA Record ID
    795784
    TITLE
    Gronk and Herron : muralists / Harry Gamboa Jr.
    IN
    Neworld: A Quarterly of the Inner City Cultural Center (Los Angeles, CA) .-- Vol. 2, no. 3 (Spring 1976)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 28 - 30 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Interviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Gamboa, Harry, Jr. "Gronk and Herron : muralists." Neworld: A Quarterly of the Inner City Cultural Center (Los Angeles, CA), vol.  2, no. 3 (Spring 1976).
Synopsis

In this interview, Harry Gamboa, Jr. talks to muralists, Gronk and Willie Herrón. Gamboa’s introduction describes the collaborations of Gronk and Herrón that began in 1972: the two East Los Angeles muralists met that year and started collaborating on painted murals, and later on performance-based “mural” media—portable murals, walking murals, and instant murals—as well as on radio, video, and film works. Gamboa states that Herrón, Gronk, and Patssi Valdez adopted the name ASCO in 1974 (but does not comment on his own participation as a founding member of the group). The interview describes ASCO’s street performances, Walking Mural, First Supper, Instant Mural, and Birds Wave Goodbye. Three of Gamboa’s photographs are printed in this text: portraits of Gronk, Herrón, and a photo of the artists and Patssi Valdez in Walking Mural.

Annotations

Though presented as such, this interview can also be considered as a conceptual artwork by the interviewer (Gamboa) and interviewees (Gronk and Herrón), who were at the time collaborators and founding members of the conceptual art group, ASCO, along with Patssi Valdez. The interviewees’ responses are clearly playful and irreverent, following the logic of free association and wordplay, instead of a standard Q&A, question-and-answer format. ASCO, a visual and performance art group active in the 1970s and ‘80s Los Angeles, used Conceptual art to draw attention to the socioeconomic living conditions in East Los Angeles as well as the racist, negative portrayal of Chicanos in the media.

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the author, Los Angeles, CA