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  • ICAA Record ID
    795762
    TITLE
    Gronk : off-the-wall artist / Interview by Harry Gamboa Jr.
    IN
    Neworld : a publication of the Los Angeles Cultural Center (Los, Angeles, CA). -- Vol. 6, no. 4. (Jul./Aug.,1980)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 33-43 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Interviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Gamboa, Harry, Jr. "Gronk : off-the-wall artist." Neworld  (Los, Angeles, CA) 6, no. 4. (July/August, 1980): 33-43
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

 Harry Gamboa, Jr. begins the interview with comments on the early performances, street theater, and multimedia conceptual works of Gronk from the 1960s and ‘70s. In the interview, Gamboa and Gronk both discuss the “No Movies,” an invented intermedia genre that included performance, photography, and postal distribution, which converse at length about their political significance. Gronk discusses the 1978 exhibition, Dreva/Gronk 1968–78: Ten Years of Art/Life, created with longtime collaborator Jerry Dreva and held at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions in Los Angeles, California. He describes the performance-based works he created with ASCO collaborator Patssi Valdez, and Cyclona, a street performer and cult figure from East Los Angeles. The text includes reproductions of Gamboa’s photographs, including one image circulated as a “No Movie.”

Annotations

 While this text has the format of a traditional interview, it can also be viewed as a conceptual literary work created by artistic collaborators, Harry Gamboa, Jr. and Gronk. This “interview” was written during the collaboration of Gronk and Gamboa in ASCO, a visual and performance art group that was active in Los Angeles in the 1970s and ‘80s. Other members included Patssi Valdez and Willie Herrón. Some “No-Movies” are attributed to ASCO, and some to Gronk alone. As the artists include interviews within the capacious “No Movie” genre, this text could be considered part of the interventionist art “No-Movie” apparatus, which challenged the negative, racist portrayal of Chicanos in the media. 

Researcher
Tere Romo
Team
Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the author, Los Angeles, CA
Reproduced with permission of Gronk, Los Angeles, CA