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  • ICAA Record ID
    795102
    TITLE
    ¿Qué piensan los misioneros del INBA? : Rina Lazo y García Bustos en Oaxaca / Por Raquel Tibol
    IN
    México en la Cultura : suplemento cultural de Novedades (México, D. F., México). -- Mar. 24, 1957
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 7 ; ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Tibol, Raquel. "¿Qué piensan los misioneros del INBA?: Rina Lazo y García Bustos en Oaxaca." México en la cultura: Suplemento cultural de Novedades (Mexico City), March 24, 1957.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    García Bustos, Arturo, 1926-; Lazo, Rina
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
    Mexico; Oaxaca, Mexico
Synopsis

Most of this short article consists of the words of the artist from Guatemala, Rina Lazo—a naturalized Mexican—from an interview with the critic Raquel Tibol. Lazo recalls her training and the reasons she came to Mexico in 1946. At that time, Lazo was associated with a group called “Los Fridos,” and she tells the story of the work rendered by the group from its beginnings when the members were students of Frida Kahlo at la Esmeralda. Finally, she speaks at length on the mural she is currently painting in Oaxaca with her partner Arturo García Bustos.

Annotations

The four painters known as “Los Fridos”—Arturo García Bustos (b. 1926), Fanny Rabel (1922-2008), Guillermo Monroy (b. 1924) and Arturo Estrada (b. 1925)—came together through classes taught by Frida Kahlo in her house in Coyoacán to third year painting students. Frida’s health problems and physical limitations prevented her from going to the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes located in Mexico City downtown. Los Fridos, who took Rina Lazo (b. 1928) into their group, specialized in the creation of murals whose motifs were in line with the old slogans from their beginnings in the 1920s. Backed by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (INBA), they executed a number of works within that movement in several Mexican states. This artwork represented their reaffirmation that what was known as the Mexican School of Painting lived on.

Researcher
Diana Briuolo
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit

Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional. México D.F., México