Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    782511
    AUTHOR
    Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America
    TITLE
    Cry For Justice / The Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America ; Leslie F. Orear
    IMPRINT
    Chicago, IL : Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America under the direction of it's Civil Rights Department AFL/CIO, 1972
    DESCRIPTION
    [27] p. : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/Pamphlet – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Cry For Justice. Chicago: Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America [AFL / CIO], 1972.
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
    ADDITIONAL AUTHORS
    Orear, Leslie F.
Synopsis

The text Cry for Justice is composed of three parts: a statement entitled “To Listen and to Act,” photographs with extended captions of murals in Chicago since 1967, and an essay entitled “Museum of the Streets.” In the first part, the civil rights department of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, AFL/CIO declares that the booklet’s mission is to feature the murals in “black, poor-white, and Spanish neighborhoods of Chicago” that have been created by young people in response to economic and racial injustice. The second part features photographs of community murals by William Walker, Mario Castillo, Mark Rogovin and others, accompanied by quotes by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Arthur Powell Davies, John Ruskin, and others. The third and final text, “Museum of the Streets,” contextualizes the proliferation of murals in urban Chicago during the late 1960s and early 1970s within the histories of Mexican and U.S. murals created during the Great Depression.

Annotations

Cry for Justice is a booklet published in 1972 by the civil rights department of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, AFL/CIO, as part of a series of publications on issues related to civil rights and labor. It indicates the close relationship between labor unions and the artists and activists who contributed to the resurgence of mural painting in Chicago during the late 1960s and early 1970s, including members of the Chicano and Puerto Rican communities, and serves as a document of many murals that have since been destroyed. This document helps further contextualize “The Artists’ Statement” [see doc. no. 781400] in images and added textual eloquence.

Researcher
Victor Sorell; Harper Montgomery, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the United Food and Commercial Workers, International Union, Washington, DC