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  • ICAA Record ID
    782398
    TITLE
    MARCH : Movimiento Artistico Chicano (Mexican-American Art Movement)
    IN
    Quarterly (Chicago). -- Spring 1976.
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 10, 13-14 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH). "MARCH." Quarterly (Chicago), Spring 1976, 10; 13-14.
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

The writer discusses the Chicago-based art collective Movimiento Artistico Chicano (MARCH), providing an overview of its mission and wide variety of activities, which included mural commissions in Chicago and the Midwest, the first annual Mexican-American fiesta at the Museum of Science and Industry, and exhibitions and cultural exchanges with Mexican museums and curators. Mentioned is Mexposicion, in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (INBA) of Mexico, which showcased twenty-five artworks by major Mexican artists including Orozco, Rivera, and Tamayo, as well as plans for another exhibition featuring photographs of Agustin Victor Casasola. The text also includes quotes by Jose Gamaliel Gonzalez and Victor A. Sorell. 

Annotations

Published in the spring 1976 issue of the Quarterly, published by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, this text outlines MARCH’s history and its mission for a broader audience of artists and critics in Chicago. It also contextualizes its activities within the history of Latinos, including Puerto Ricans and Mexicans in Chicago, and its interest in promoting cultural ties with Latin America. Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH) was originally founded as Movimiento Artístico de la Raza Chicana in 1972 in East Chicago, Indiana, and was renamed MARCH in Chicago in 1975. In addition to muralists, members included graphic artists, photographers, filmmakers, art historians, poets, and anthropologists, among them Santiago Boiton, Mario Castillo, Carlos Cortéz, Carlos Cumpián, José Gamaliel González, Lawrence Hurlburt, Ray M. Patlán, Victor A. Sorell, and Susan Stechnij. Furthermore, MARCH, beginning in the fall of 1976 until the late 1970s, published the quarterly newsletter ABRAZO [Hug] that featured editorials, interviews with artists, and news on cultural activities in the Chicago area. 

Researcher
Olga Herrera; Harper Montgomery, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA
Credit
Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL