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  • ICAA Record ID
    782295
    TITLE
    MARCH : Movimiento Artístico Chicano
    IMPRINT
    Chicago, IL : El Movimiento Artistico Chicano (MARCH), 1975/1976
    DESCRIPTION
    1 leave : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English; Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Loose leaf – Brochure
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION

    MARCH: Movimiento Artístico Chicano. Chicago: MARCH, 1975/1976.

    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    Boiton, Santiago; Cortez Koyokuikatl, Carlos; MARCH (Organization); Nario, José; Patlán, Ray; Teatro del Barrio
Synopsis

This modest, illustrated recruitment brochure provides a descriptive capsular history of the Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH) group since its inception in 1972 in East Chicago, Indiana, through its official chartering in 1975 in Chicago’s Pilsen barrio, and beyond. The group’s mission—“the desire and willingness to promote Latin[o] art and artistic creativeness in the Midwest . . . and to cooperate with artists in and outside of the Midwest”—is embedded in MARCH’s variegated activities, which included organizing exhibitions of Mexican art and lectures, creating murals, maintaining a slide registry and archive, and publishing a newsletter. The organizational logo and photographs of members and cultural occasions are also included.

Annotations

This brochure, produced and distributed by Movimiento Artístico Chicano (MARCH) in 1975, includes a text explaining the history and mission of the museum, as well as a form for new members to contact the organization. MARCH’s principal founder, artist and community activist José Gamaliel González, designed the organization’s distinctive logo, a stylized version of Mexico’s national symbol of the eagle with a serpent. Photographs of MARCH members Carlos Cortez [Koyokuikatl], José Nario, Santiago Boiton, and Ray[mundo] Patlán shown engaged in cultural activities and with the neighborhood performance group, Teatro del Barrio, and a nearly complete image of The Forbidden Mural in Blue Island completed in 1975 in Illinois and later renamed The History of the Mexican-American Worker.

Researcher
Victor Sorell; Harper Montgomery, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA
Credit
Courtesy of MARCH Abrazo Press, MARCH Inc.,Chicago, IL;
Private collection of Victor Alejandro Sorell, Chicago, IL