Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

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  • ICAA Record ID
    781546
    TITLE
    Raza Art / Anna L. Cardona
    IN
    Raza Art & Media Collective Journal (Ann Arbor, MI). -- Jan. 1, 1976
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 2
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Cardona, Anna L. "Raza Art." Raza Art & Media Collective Journal (Ann Arbor), January 1976, 2.
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

In this document, Ana L. Cardona, a Chicago-based artist, argues for a national and ethnic art based on the experiences of Chicano and Puerto Rican communities in the United States and counters the idea of the universality of art. The "raza art" term, she explains, encompasses the artistic production of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans while also recognizing their differences in ideology and aesthetics.

Annotations

The text by the educator and cultural producer Ana L. Cardona was published January 1, 1976, in Raza Art & Media Collective Journal, which was published in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Partly a manifesto, it positions raza artists, which include Puerto Ricans and Chicanos, against mainstream, homogenized American culture. It also seeks to establish a history for raza art by citing artists' experiences (including members of the group Con Safo, Felipe Reyes and Santos Martinez, who were students at the University of Michigan in the mid-1970s). Cardona was the co-founder of the Raza Art & Media Collective in 1975 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, along with other artists, historians, and art historians including Jesse Gonzalez, George Vargas, Zaragoza Vargas, S. Zaneta Kosiba-Vargas, and Michael J. Garcia. Cardona also was involved with the statewide arts and cultural organization in Michigan, Nuestras Artes de Michigan [Our Arts from Michigan] in 1978 and later Artes Unidas de Michigan [United Arts of Michigan] in 2002.

Researcher
Olga Herrera; Harper Montgomery, collaborator
Team
Institute for Latino Studies, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, USA
Credit
Courtesy of the private archives of Ana Luisa Cardona, East Lancing, MI