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  • ICAA Record ID
    778126
    TITLE
    El baile nefando
    IN
    El País : Diario católico (México, D. F., México). -- Nov. 22, 1901.
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 1
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    "El baile nefando." El país: Diario católico (Mexico City), November 22, 1901.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

This article is the first one to mention the aspect that will make this news item popular and notorious: “The fact is that a number of people in a segment of society deemed honorable were by chance discovered in a sphere that represents extreme depravity. So how hard could it be to deduce all the things that have not been discovered?” This questioning implicated Ignacio de la Torre, a son-in-law of Porfirio Díaz, as well as the sons of several other important government officials.

Annotations

During the Porfirio Díaz administration, any press references to sexual heterogeneity were veiled, but it was in 1901, based on a scandalous raid on a clandestine dance, that the subject became relevant.

El País (founded by Trinidad Sánchez), a Catholic newspaper with conservative tendencies, became a defender of morality when it categorized this event as an “odious dance.” It also took advantage of the moment to settle scores with the liberals. Thus the publication stated that “the authorization of licentiousness,”—which, for this newspaper, is a natural consequence of liberalism—leads “by inescapable logic to the abysm of aberrations that at first glance seem unbelievable.” This led to a dispute with the semi-official newspaper, El Imparcial, which defended both “liberalism and progress” (bastions of the political system of Porfirio Díaz). El País, a daily newspaper that considered liberalism the cause of the scandalous dance, fired off a round of attacks. El Imparcial replied that the pride of Mexico were historic figures such as Benito Juárez, José María Iglesias and Ignacio Ramírez, all notable liberals. 

From that night on, in Mexican culture, to say “forty-one” was both a reference to homosexuality and an indicator of intolerance.

Researcher
Alejandro García
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit

Location
Fondo Reservado del Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional