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  • ICAA Record ID
    775057
    TITLE
    Tres murales sobre la revolución, la legalidad y la paz / Por Raquel Tibol
    IN
    México en la Cultura : suplemento cultural de Novedades (México, D. F., México). -- Ago. 11, 1957
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 7 ; 9 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Tibol, Raquel. "Tres murales sobre la revolución, la legalidad y la paz." México en la cultura: Suplemento cultural de Novedades (Mexico City), August 11, 1957.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

The art critic Raquel Tibol, an Argentine native who arrived in Mexico in 1953, uses mural works in progress by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Jorge González Camarena, and Fanny Rabel, as examples of the vitality of the post-revolutionary pictorial movement in Mexico. And she adds: “it has not stagnated as some people wish to suggest.” For the author, muralism will be the precursor “in the very near future, to a humanistic phase of synthesis.” On the other hand, Tibol believes that in the work of certain artists, the “exclusive exaltation” of elements inherent to the work, in detriment of others elements, has failed. A situation as such “has been clearly proven in the premature aging of the formalist compositions of Carlos Mérida or the constructivist-expressionist vagueness of Rufino Tamayo.”

Annotations

This is an article in defense of the so-called Mexican school of painting, as it confronted the presence of a variety of avant-garde movements in the art world, all of which arrived in Mexico following World War II. Tibol makes an analogy between these movements and “an anatomical dissection” of painting, valid as a means for studying the behavior of elements intrinsic to the work. With this positivist metaphor she concludes that, just like in the field of medicine, once such “dissections” are undertaken, they should be placed again at the service of a “living organism.” In the field of visual arts, this would imply a return to figuration with social content. Tibol’s article refers to Henri Matisse’s opinions regarding art that, for this critic, are tantamount to giving it “a narcotizing function, . . . ridiculous in their falseness.”

Researcher
Diana Briuolo : CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit

Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional