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  • ICAA Record ID
    770433
    TITLE
    Rufino Tamayo y los pintores cubanos : como soluciones al problema estético americano : José Gómez Sicre ofreció las soluciones anoche en conferencia que dicto en el Museo de Bellas Artes
    IN
    El Nacional : Órgano Oficial del Gobierno de México (México, D. F., México). -- Dic. 11, 1953
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    "Rufino Tamayo y los pintores cubanos: Como soluciones al problema estético americano." El Nacional: Órgano oficial del gobierno de México (Mexico City), December 11, 1953.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

The art critic José Gómez Sicre, chief of the Pan-American Union Visual Arts Unit (Washington, D.C.), presented a lecture on the painter Rufino Tamayo, whom he hailed as the artist to revive Mexican painting. Gómez Sicre’s belief that Mexican art was bogged down by the powerful muralist movement informed his discussion of the trends that defined Latin American art of the time. On one hand there was nationalism, with its excessive xenophobia, dismissive of the European art experience. By contrast, the formalist art trend lacked any sense of nationality and was indeed subject to European culture. The Cuban critic chose Tamayo as an example of an eclectic painter whom he considered the standard-bearer for a healthy nationalism that was not too strident. Tamayo’s work had a universal point of view and was incorporated into all the modern pictorial currents.

Annotations

Rufino Tamayo (1899-1991) had achieved a position as one of Mexico’s most powerful painters. He was already recognized worldwide; his style reflected the avant-garde language of the period and attempted to integrate the ancient cultures and modern/original elements. After World War II, the style known as “primitive” had taken hold; this was why Tamayo’s paintings were so well received in international circles. 

Faced with this art debate, the Cuban art critic and diplomat José Gómez Sicre (1916-1991) believed the correct solution was the path forged by Tamayo. The movement that Tamayo started eliminated indeed the anecdotal and allowed for European influence without subordinating itself to European art. He made use of the European experience in searching for art that expressed what was specifically Latin American.

Researcher
Ana María Torres
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Reproduced with permission of Horacio Sicre, Fort Myers, Fla.
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional. México D.F., México