Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

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  • ICAA Record ID
    766142
    TITLE
    Abraham Haber / Haber, Abraham
    IN
    Contrabienal. -- Contrabienal. [Nueva York, N. Y.] : Museo Latinoamericano : Movimiento por la Independencia Cultural de Latino América, [1971].
    DESCRIPTION
    1 leaf.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Press Release
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Haber, Abraham. "Abraham Haber." In Contrabienal. [Nueva York, N. Y.] : Museo Latinoamericano : Movimiento por la Independencia Cultural de Latino América, [1971].
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

Abraham Haber responds to the summons to carry out a counter-biennial with his contribution, in spite of making it clear that he has received an invitation intended for the artists. He is however a professor of art history and a member of the Asociación de Argentina de Críticos de Arte [Argentinean Art Critics Association].

Annotations

Abraham Haber was a philosopher and an art critic from Argentina, who— within the Argentinean Concrete avant-garde—promoted the trend known as Perceptivism, As an art critic, he wrote for the newspaper Clarín and the journals Actualidad en el Arte [Art Today], Arte al Día [Art Up to Date], and Artinf, among others.

 

It must be taken into account that, since its inception in 1951, the São Paulo Biennial was a focal point for both the circulation and the consecration of Latin American art. The document is a response to the open summons carried out by the action-nucleus that was generated around the Museo Latinoamericano, and made up by a group of New York-based visual artists, in addition to the MICLA [Latin American Cultural Independence Movement]. This response was published in the book Contrabienal [Counter- Biennial] designed and printed by the group made up of Luis Wells, Luis Camnitzer, Carla Stellweg, Liliana Porter, and Teodoro Maus. There, the initiative of opposition to the Brazilian biennial (so-called “the Dictatorial Biennial”) was displayed. Given the fact that Brazil—like many other Latin American countries in the 1970s—was ruled by an adamant regime of censorship, repression, and torture, this document brings to light one of the strategies of resistance wielded by artists to confront any kind of dictatorial policies.

Researcher
Cristina Rossi.
Team
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Location
Archivo Juan Carlos Romero.