Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

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  • ICAA Record ID
    766029
    TITLE
    Julio Le Parc : función social del arte en la sociedad contemporánea / Julio Le Parc
    IN
    Contrabienal. -- [Nueva York, Estados Unidos] : [s. n.], [1971]
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Artists’ Statement
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Le Parc, Julio. "Julio Le Parc: función social del arte en la sociedad contemporánea." In Contrabienal. [Nueva York]: by Luis Wells, Luis Camnitzer, Carla Stellweg, Liliana Porter and Teodoro Maus, [1971]. 
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

Julio Le Parc responds to a request to side against the 1971 São Paulo Biennial. This artist wrote a statement in which the crisis of art is brought up. After enumerating several issues at stake, he concludes that the art’s revolution will be carried out by the people when they reject the bourgeois notion of art and possibilities for new relationships among men are created.

Annotations

Julio Le Parc (1928) is an artist born in Mendoza, Argentina; he settled in París from 1958 on, where he formed the Groupe de Recherche de l’Art Visuel  or GRAV,[Paris-based Experimental Visual Arts Group] with which his kinetic proposals were continued, mostly using light.

It must be taken into account that, since its inception in 1951, the São Paulo Biennial was a focal point for both the circulation and the consecration of Latin American art. The document is a response to the open summons carried out by the action-nucleus that was generated around the Museo Latinoamericano, and made up by a group of New York-based visual artists, in addition to the MICLA [Latin American Cultural Independence Movement]. This response was published in the book Contrabienal [Counter- Biennial] designed and printed by the group made up of Luis Wells, Luis Camnitzer, Carla Stellweg, Liliana Porter, and Teodoro Maus. There, the initiative of opposition to the Brazilian biennial (so-called “the Dictatorial Biennial”) was displayed. Given the fact that Brazil—like many other Latin American countries in the 1970s—was ruled by an adamant regime of censorship, repression, and torture, this document brings to light one of the strategies of resistance wielded by artists to confront any kind of dictatorial policies.

Researcher
Cristina Rossi
Team
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Credit
Courtesy of the Private Archives of Julio Le Parc, Cachan, France.
Location
Archivo Juan Carlos Romero.