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  • ICAA Record ID
    765773
    AUTHOR
    García Ponce, Juan
    TITLE
    Leonora Carrington : Un lenguaje simbólico que expresa la realidad / Por JUAN GARCIA PONCE
    IN
    México en la Cultura : Suplemento Cultural de Novedades (México, D. F., México). -- Ago. 7, 1960
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 1 ; 6 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    García Ponce, Juan. "Leonora Carrington: Un lenguaje simbólico que expresa la realidad." México en la cultura: Suplemento cultural de Novedades (Mexico City), August 7, 1960.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In the writer’s view, Leonora Carrington’s work expresses different parts of a whole that complement each other perfectly: life and death, wakefulness and sleep, reality and imagination. These all express an alternate side of reality; which is why García Ponce calls her a “realist painter” who, dissatisfied with appearances, seeks to proffer images that clarify her meaning. One should not look for a symbolic language because the painter provides concrete visions of reality, in which life regains its cosmic sense. The article describes Carrington’s work as a collection of local customs to which she adds seemingly trivial elements, all filtered through a mixture of amazement and surprise at seeing the truth exposed by inner contemplation. 

Annotations

As an art critic, Juan García Ponce (1932-2003) promoted the careers of many young artists (including his own brother Fernando) who were looking for new spaces where they could show their work and searching for the media that would promote it. García Ponce, who was deeply involved with the Ruptura generation, devoted several essays to discussing Leonora Carrington’s production. Carrington, in turn, was deeply involved in many of the writer’s literary projects, not just as an illustrator but also by contributing her poems and stories. Carrington’s work was accepted by critics of many stripes, which suggests a certain distance between the painter and the internal turmoil in Mexican art circles.     

Researcher
Mireida Velázquez : CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Courtesy of Mercedes García Oteyza © Juan García Ponce, Oxford, England
Location
Biblioteca Miguel Lerdo de Tejada de la Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público