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  • ICAA Record ID
    764691
    TITLE
    Frida Kahlo : La mujer que venció al dolor / Por Antonio RODRIGUEZ
    IN
    Impacto (México, D. F., México). -- No. 257 (Jul. 18, 1954)
    DESCRIPTION
    ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Rodríguez, Antonio. "Frida Kahlo: La mujer que venció al dolor." Impacto (Mexico City) 5, no.257 (July 1954): n.p.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

The critic Antonio Rodríguez sings praise for the life and work of Frida Kahlo in this posthumous tribute. He reviews the salient events of her career, stressing the martyrdom that haunted her work with a mood of constant struggle. Rodríguez refers to the “terrible” sincerity projected by Kahlo’s self portraits, but he also mentions the “profound optimism” of her paintings that were full of brilliant colors, fruit, and light. He cannot look at Kahlo’s work wearing only a reviewer’s hat; he is incapable of scrutinizing the quality of her painting without considering the human being who held the brush. Rodríguez ends his article by insisting that Kahlo’s œuvre should be valued as a national treasure, and calls on the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes [INBA, National Institute of Fine Arts] to organize a tribute to her memory. He goes on to say that one day Mexicans will revere this artist’s production as much as they revere, for example, the mask of Palenque.   

Annotations

Many prominent figures in Mexican cultural and political circles attended the funeral procession for Frida Kahlo (1907-1954). Diego Rivera was there with ex-president Lázaro Cárdenas and his son Cuauhtémoc, Heriberto Jara, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and many others. The artist’s coffin was carried to the Palacio de Bellas Artes where it was covered with the flag of the Soviet Union, suggesting that Kahlo enjoyed official support in spite of being a member of the party.  

The fact that Frida Kahlo was entitled to a state funeral shows that she was unanimously acclaimed by her contemporaries, and was already seen as a gifted painter of the future. The combination of heroism, tragedy, and undeniable talent all contributed to the "myth" whose seed was planted on the day she died.

Researcher
Mireida Velázquez : CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Courtesy of María Antonieta Fernández Moreno, Mexico City, México
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional