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Synopsis

This article describes the characteristics of the works included in the exhibition Sexteto [Sextet] (Buenos Aires: Galería Lirolay, 1964) and reprints the artists’ opinions regarding the show’s classification as Pop art, a term that was used by this same magazine to describe the exhibition in a previous article (January 14, 1964). Beginning with these opinions and more importantly, the statements made by Rubén Santantonín and Pablo Mesejean, the article finds that the artists do not form a “cohesive” group with “common aspirations”; unless perhaps these are to “irritate the public with their disconcerting creations,” as well as agreeing with the notion that art “has no future only the present.” Finally [the article] also points out that as the representative of the Walker Art Institute (Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A), Jorge Romero Brest had already selected a great number of the works that composed the exhibition; these would be shown at the Walker as well as “five more United States museums.This article describes the characteristics of the works included in the exhibition Sexteto [Sextet] (Buenos Aires: Galería Lirolay, 1964) and reprints the artists’ opinions regarding the show’s classification as Pop art, a term that was used by this same magazine to describe the exhibition in a previous article (January 14, 1964). Beginning with these opinions and more importantly, the statements made by Rubén Santantonín and Pablo Mesejean, the article finds that the artists do not form a “cohesive” group with “common aspirations”; unless perhaps these are to “irritate the public with their disconcerting creations,” as well as agreeing with the notion that art “has no future only the present.” Finally [the article] also points out that as the representative of the Walker Art Institute (Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A), Jorge Romero Brest had already selected a great number of the works that composed the exhibition; these would be shown at the Walker as well as “five more United States museums.

Annotations

Sexteto (Buenos Aires: Galería Lirolay, 1964) is the name commonly used to refer to this exhibition, which is also known as 6 artistas en Lirolay. Sextexto. The participating artists were Delia Cancela, Zulema Ciordia, Marta Minujín, Pablo Mesejean, Delia Puzzovio and Rubén Santantonín.

Owned by Mario and Paulette Fano, Galería Lirolay in the 1960s was managed by Germain Derbecq, a French critic and artist, who was also the wife of sculptor Pablo Curatella Manes. The gallery would mount new shows every two weeks. It was in this space that the artists who would later that same decade gain greater visibility at the Instituto Torcuato Di Tella [Torcuato Di Tella Institute] held their first exhibitions.

Primera Plana was the most prominent general information weekly of the 1960s. It was closely linked to the processes of economic and cultural modernization. The debate sparked by Primera Plana concerning the “Pop art” trend reveals the problems that art circles in Buenos Aires had in naming the [aforementioned] aesthetic productions that differed, at that time, from the traditional canonical notions of “artwork.”

Researcher
Natalia Pineau.
Team
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Location
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.