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  • ICAA Record ID
    760584
    AUTHOR
    Blum, Sigwart
    TITLE
    Apuntes marginales sobre el arte / Sigwart Blum, Libero Badii
    IMPRINT
    Buenos Aires, Argentina : [s.n.], 1968
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 4-22 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/Pamphlet – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Blum, Sigwart. "Apuntes marginales sobre el arte." In Libero Badii: dibujos año 1945: “apuntes de viajes”, 4– 22. Buenos Aires, 1968.
     
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Sigwart Blum developed in these notes the relationship between ancient cultures and dualism in nature. He even analyzed symbols as discharged energy, continually active for thousands of years and surfacing in everyday situations. He linked Líbero Badii’s work with art from the Inca Empire and then went on to define lo siniestro [what is sinister] as being “the original impulse that determines the work, so much and more than the environment in which the artist lives.” In his reading of Badii, lo siniestro was a “continuous flow.” On the other hand, Blum examined the protective symbols of Latin American cultures. He held that the argument in Badii’s works implies the four cardinal points as his own spatial expression, giving form in this way to an entire cosmology. The critic predicted that in the course of a cyclical process, the art of the future would abandon being imitative in order to become symbolic.  

Annotations

Líbero Badii (Arezzo, Italy, 1916–Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2001) developed principally a sculpture of symbolic meaning. In the 1950s, after traveling throughout Latin America, his work was influenced by the pre-Columbian art form. Badii elaborated on “the sinister” concept, as being a form both of knowledge as well as feeling. He named his workspace Almataller [Soul-Shop]. 

Sigwart Blum was born in Germany in 1906; he came to Argentina in 1936 as an immigrant. He was a photographer, in addition to being an art critic for the German-language newspaper of Buenos Aires Argentinisches Tageblatt [The Daily Argentinean].

This essay is central to understanding the relationship between the notion of “sinister art” developed by Libero Badii and American pre-Columbian culture.

Researcher
Roberto Amigo.
Team
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Location
Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires, Argentina.