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  • ICAA Record ID
    759435
    TITLE
    [Admiro con temor las grandes esculturas de Badii...] / Jorge Romero Brest
    IN
    Libero Badii : labor expuesta. -- Buenos Aires, Argentina : Galería Witcomb, 18 de agosto al 9 de septiembre de 1963
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 3-5 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Catalogs
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Romero Brest, Jorge. "[Admiro con temor las grandes esculturas de Badii...]." In Libero Badii: labor expuesta. Exh. cat. Buenos Aires: Galería Witcomb, 1963.
     
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

By means o a poetic prose, art critic Jorge Romero Brest states that he fearfully admires the huge sculptures and lovingly cares about the drawings and small sculptures made by Líbero Badii. He analyzes the relationship between art and life, from such formal aspects as that of a “creative communication.”

Annotations

Líbero Badii (Arezzo, Italy, 1916–Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2001) was initially involved with the symbolic meaning in sculpture. In the 1950s, after having traveled throughout Latin America, his work was formally influenced by Pre-Columbian art. He concocted the concept of “the sinister,” both as a form of knowledge and as a way of feeling. The artist named his studio-workshop as Almataller [SoulShop]. 

Jorge Romero Brest (1904–1989) was the director of the Ver y estimar [To See and Ponder] journal (1948–55). He was appointed inspector of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes [National Museum of Fine Arts] in 1955, and served as its director from 1956 until 1963, the year he resigned to assume the direction of the Centro de Artes Visuales [Visual Arts Center] of the Instituto Di Tella, for which he was a consultant. In 1962 and being the director, Romero Brest organized an exhibition by Líbero Badii at the MNBA.

This document stands out for the singularity of the critic's writing, which is generally removed from emotional and literary criticism. In this presentation of the sculptures by Badii —at a time when Romero Brest was promoting the group Otra Figuración [Other Figuration]—he explores poetic prose, in search of a definition for “creative communication” as the theoretical safeguard of the poetic text. Curiously, his idea of fearing the sculptures by Badii is compatible with one of the definitions of “the sinister” as American art, previously elaborated by the sculptor. 

Researcher
Roberto Amigo.
Team
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Location
Fundación Espigas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.