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  • ICAA Record ID
    755372
    AUTHOR
    Rowley, Louis E.
    TITLE
    México quiere vivir en sociedad como pueblo civilizado / Louis E. Rowley
    IN
    El Maestro : Revista de cultura nacional (México, D. F., México). -- Tomo III, no. IV y V (1923)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 368-371
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Interviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Rowley, Louis E. "México quiere vivir en sociedad como pueblo civilizado." El Maestro: Revista de cultura nacional (Mexico City) 3, no.4-5 (1923): 368-371.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    Mexican; presidents; Russian; socialism
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

When Louis E. Rowley interviewed President General Álvaro Obregón, he inquired about a matter of huge concern to North Americans: Bolshevism in Mexico and the imposition of socialism. Obregón, avoiding any reference to the Soviet Union, said that Bolshevism means, primarily, that the government and the majority protect the interests of that majority. His goal, according to him, was to comply with the 1917 Constitution, and he promised that there would be no Bolshevism in Mexico. Though the 1917 Constitution liberated the destitute classes from the chains of medieval servitude, the objective now was to free them from the chains of modern economic slavery. While it is true that there is nothing more dangerous than breaking the chains of slavery, no act is nobler in a man’s life. The people and the government constitute one single organism. The interviewer concluded that Mexico was a victim of local “reactionary forces” and persistent distortions of its goals by foreigners. 

Annotations

These are the political opinions of General Álvaro Obregón—who was president for the period 1920-24—as expressed in an interview that was published in Revista El Maestro in 1923; they were thus conveyed to the whole country by teachers in charge of educating the masses. This magazine was illustrated by the artists who were involved in the mural movement that expressed the same concepts mentioned by President Obregón. The goal was to create and communicate a unified idea of Mexico as a nation through interviews, murals, and publications, among other media.

Researcher
Esther Acevedo : Dirección de Estudios Históricos, INAH / CURARE A. C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit

Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional