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  • ICAA Record ID
    752234
    AUTHOR
    Treviño, Ana Cecilia
    TITLE
    Tamayo define su posición : su verdadera historia / BAMBI
    IN
    Excélsior : El periódico de la vida Nacional (México, D. F., México). -- Jun. 21, 1953
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 1-C ; 15-C : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Biographies
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Bambi [Ana Cecilia Treviño]. "Tamayo define su posición: Su verdadera historia." Excélsior: El periódico de la vida nacional (Mexico City), June 21, 1953.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

Rufino Tamayo clarifies his position on a variety of subjects and controversies that have dogged his artistic work. He touches on the debate between nationalism and universalism, and refers to the subjects that he considers appropriate for Mexican art. Tamayo also defends his own aesthetic development and presents himself as a painter with academic training but also with the sensibility of his native roots. In this interview, Tamayo portrays himself as an artist who lacks both the support of the government and the recognition of Mexican critics; he does, however, claim that he is validated by his success abroad.

Annotations

Through a series of convincing statements in which Rufino Tamayo (1899-1991) defines his attitude and the self-image he seeks to project, it can be understood how the artist constructed his own myth. Thanks to his ability to manipulate both the press and the critics through the arguments that he consistently relied upon, Tamayo alternately referred to his preconceived "indigenous origin" and his supposedly "marginal condition" which excluded him from any state patronage. 

This article helps to explain the artist's great skill in manipulating controversial issues and in establishing and polishing--in Mexico and abroad--the image that made him the standard bearer of "the other" possible Mexican School of Painting. Little attention is paid here to the patronage and the close relationship with the government that he in fact enjoyed even though this interview was conducted shortly after he had finished painting his murals at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City.  

Researcher
Mireida Velázquez
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional. Mexico D.F., México