Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    737586
    TITLE
    Horizonte : Revista mensual de actividad contemporánea / [Director Germán List Arzubide]
    IMPRINT
    Jalapa, Veracruz; México : [s.n.], 1927
    DESCRIPTION
    54 p.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Other – Other
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    List Arzubide, Germán. "Horizonte: Revista mensual de actividad contemporánea."
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

The magazine Horizonte [Horizon] had excellent cover designers such as Leopoldo Méndez and Ramón Alva de la Canal. Canal was the one who created this cover as well as many vignettes, all of which were very well sketched. 

Annotations

The magazine Horizonte (1926-1927) was one of the publications of the Etridentista movement once it established its presence in Xalapa (Veracruz). The “X” in Xalapa was added by the etridentistas; they designated the provincial enclave as the center of their cultural revolution. Although they published other magazines such as Irradiador [Irradiator] and Ser [Being], it was Horizonte that contained social and political topics, and at the same time fewer poems, appeals and irreverent texts that had characterized the group at its beginnings.   The ten issues of Horizonte, edited by Germán List Arzubide, are proof of the proletarian-ization of the etridentistas’] aesthetic and social stances. Horizonte is important not only because it published articles on modernity, but also because it contained writings on the group’s social causes, including the education revolution.   Estridentismo, an early Mexican avant-garde movement, arose at the end of 1921, at the same time as the Muralist movement. Its creator, and for some time its only member, was Manuel Maples Arce, a poet from Veracruz who openly denounced modernist poets and the pictorial academy. As evidenced by the group’s publications, the movement was related to Dadaism, Futurism, Ultraism and Creationism—in their European and Latin American strains. Indeed, Etridentismo was a movement focused on agitation strategies through its deep connection to a mechanical aesthetics. They promoted a new urban sensibility, wherein experiences amassed together simultaneously, at the same pace as modern life. The very name of the movement refers to the hustle and bustle of the city, but also to its will to be acknowledged both for its embedded transgressions and excesses.

Researcher
Francisco Reyes Palma
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Archivo Francisco Reyes Palma