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  • ICAA Record ID
    737428
    TITLE
    Marinetti y la última renovación futurista : “El Tactilismo” / Rafael Lozano
    IN
    El Universal Ilustrado (México, D. F., México). -- No. 200 (Mar. 3, 1921)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 19 ; 46 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – notes
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Lozano, Rafael. "Marinetti y la última renovación futurista: "El Tactilismo." El Universal Ilustrado (México D.F., México), no. 200, March 3, 1921, 16, 46.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    avant-garde; Futurist; Tactilist
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

This article recounts an interview of Filippo Tomasso Marinetti conducted by Rafael Lozano when he visited the Italian poet in Paris. The text provides an ample description of the new “tactile” aesthetic that the futurist promoted as well as some parole in libertà [liberated words] on the topic of sensation. Marinetti upholds Tactilism as a “new” trend in art, but according to Lozano it has always existed. He also lists the steps that the Italian poet took to give new drive to the sensory experiences that had previously been so neglected.

Annotations

Although Rafael Lozano (1899-) had kept his readers informed of the happenings of the avant-garde, on this occasion his article concerns the impact of Dadaism during Filippo Tomasso Marinetti’s (1876-1944) lecture. The Italian poet differentiates between the potential for a futurist renewal in spite of the anti-art posture of its opponents that coincides with the Mexican critics’ rejection of Dadaism.

Dadaism and Futurism were important for the emergence of Estridentismo (1921-1927) in Mexico; it was a movement focused on strategies of agitation and a limitless affinity for machine-like aesthetics. The movement, which was similar to the aforementioned European avant-garde, thus advocated a new urban sensibility wherein experiences smash together simultaneously, in a manner similar to the speed of modern life. The name of the movement refers to the noise of the city, but also to its desire to be heard through its embedded transgressions and excesses.

Researcher
Francisco Reyes Palma
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Courtesy of El Universal de México, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional