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  • ICAA Record ID
    737416
    TITLE
    El endemoniado Dadá se adueña de París / Por Rafael Lozano
    IN
    El Universal Ilustrado (México, D. F., México). -- No. 196 (Feb. 3, 1921)
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 28-29; 43
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Journal article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Lozano, Rafael. "El endemoniado Dadá se adueña de París." El Universal Ilustrado (Mexico City), February 3, 1921.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In his article the poet from Monterrey, Rafael Lozano, refers to the leaders of Dadaism: Tristan Tzara in Zurich, Switzerland and Francis Picabia in New York. He hopes sarcastically that the tenets of Dadaism will be sung just like the French national anthem or a Mexican corrido [narrative song]. In the same tone, Lozano gives an account of the movement’s publications, emphasizing their nihilism. For the Mexican author, Dadaism represents anti-naturalism; a mechanism equivalent to the place that Leninism holds in politics. Finally, he discounts them as a group of sterile and destructive artists that are praised only by imbeciles and social climbers that cling to the Parisian fashion.

Annotations

Rafael Lozano (1899-) published his book of hai-kai in Paris in 1921 and the following year, in the magazine Prisma in Buenos Aires. This allowed him to maintain contact with the European avant-garde, although he did not always share its principles, such as in the case of this skeptical commentary on Dadaism. Hai-kai is a type of Japanese poetry that predates haiku; its format is very brief (3 lines of 5-7-5 syllables respectively). 

Dadaism and Futurism were important for the emergence of Estridentismo (1921-1927) in Mexico; that latter movement focused on strategies of agitation and a limitless affinity for machine-like aesthetics. The movement, which was similar to the aforementioned European avant-garde, thus advocated a new urban sensibility wherein experiences smashed together simultaneously, in a manner similar to the speed of modern life. The name of the movement refers to the noise of the city, but also to its desire to be heard through its embedded transgressions and excesses.

Researcher
Francisco Reyes Palma : CURARE A.C.
Team
CURARE, Espacio crítico para las artes, Mexico City, Mexico
Credit
Courtesy of El Universal de México, Mexico City, Mexico
Location
Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas : Biblioteca Nacional/Hemeroteca Nacional