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    Synopsis

    The editorial page in the second issue of Arte Madí Universal, the magazine published by the Movimiento de Arte Madí (Madinemsor), included a couple of photographs of the group’s installation at the third Salon des Réalités Nouvelles held at the Palais des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, July 23 to August 30, 1948. This installation—Madí’s very first overseas exhibition—gave the group its first taste of international recognition.

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    The editorial page in the second issue of Arte Madí Universal, the magazine published by the Movimiento de Arte Madí (Madinemsor), included a couple of photographs of the stand that the group installed at the third Salon des Réalités Nouvelles held at the Palais des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, July 23 to August 30, 1948. This installation—Madí’s very first overseas exhibition—gave the group its first taste of international recognition. This editorial essay pronounced the exhibition “a great success” and named the members of the Salon’s committee, which included the French painter Félix del Marle (1889–1952) who served as Secretary General. In the “Aquí Madí” section of the magazine, the editorial board thanked del Marle for his efforts to ensure that Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile were represented at this exhibition [see ICAA digital archive (doc. no. 1306852)]. Also of interest is del Marle’s letter to the leader of the movement, the Czech sculptor and poet Gyula Kosice [Fernando Fallik] (b. Kosice, Slovakia, 1924; d. Buenos Aires, 2016), inviting him and the rest of the group to participate in the Salon (doc. no. 1308110).

     

    The Madí movement participated in the third Salon des Réalités Nouvelles, representing the non-figurative art movements in Argentina and Uruguay. Kosice was the organizer of the exhibition; he arranged the trip and selected the works to be shown. As noted in the “Aquí Madí” section mentioned above, the artist Jacqueline Lorin-Kaldor took the Madí works to Paris (doc. no. 1306852). Participants in the exhibition were: Kosice, under his own name as well as the heteronym he sometimes used in those days: Raymundo Rasas Pet; the Uruguayan visual artist Rhod Rothfuss [Carlos María Rothfuss] (1920–69), the co-founder of the movement; the Argentinean visual artist and poet Diyi Laañ (1927–2007), who married Kosice in 1947; and the visual artists Aníbal J. Biedma, María Bresler, Juan P. Delmonte, Lorin-Kaldor, Ricardo Pereyra, and Rodolfo Ian Uricchio. The photographs show a collection of the group’s emblematic works: paintings with trimmed or irregular frames, and articulated and transformable paintings and sculptures. These works were hung on the walls and placed on the floor of the exhibition space under the title of “Argentina.” Kosice exhibited a playful articulated sculpture, a linear movement sculpture, and a rotatable plural sculpture, all under his own name; under his heteronym he presented a white space painting, an articulated painting, and a moveable object. The project’s unconventional organization—that was vaguely reminiscent of an older style of art salon installation—created a random, anti-hierarchical impression that was consistent with Madí’s fundamental principles. Possibly because of the need to adapt to the layout of the salon, however, there were no musical compositions, poems, photomontages, architectural models, or performances of the kind that were very much part of the group’s original exhibition at the Instituto Francés de Estudios Superiores de Buenos Aires in August 1946. An installation along those lines would have provided a far more complete example of the multidisciplinary nature of the Madí group that, since its earliest days, sought to integrate the various aspects of art production and transform modern life with an aesthetic “continuum” according to the program presented in their “Manifiesto Madí” [see the ICAA digital archive (doc. no. 732008)]. Participants in the Madí group’s first exhibition in Buenos Aires (doc. no. 751035) included Laañ, the Argentinean poet Edgar Bayley (1919–90), the German visual artist Martín Blaszko (1920–2011), the Chilean poet Vicente Huidobro (1893–1948), Valdo Wellington, Elizabeth Steiner, the composers Estéban Eitler [Stefan Eitler] (1913–60) and Juan Carlos Paz (1897–1972), the architect Ricardo Humbert, and the dancer and choreographer Paulina Ossona (1923–2005). During the course of the exhibition, among other activities, Arden Quin read the group’s manifesto and Ossona performed a “Madí dance.”