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  • ICAA Record ID
    1168044
    TITLE
    Naturaleza al desnudo / Roberto Guevara
    IN
    El Nacional (Caracas, Venezuela). -- Jul. 12, 1983
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Guevaea, Roberto. "Naturaleza al desnudo." El Nacional (Caracas, Venezuela). July 12, 1983.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

Roberto Guevara reviews what are described as the first and second stages in Corina Briceño’s career as an artist. Guevara begins by contextualizing her generation; he mentions that she is committed to reclaiming “a new humanism” expressed through new visual ideas. He also notes that Briceño began as a draftswoman, capturing her natural, everyday surroundings in drawings so that others might see them too. Guevara identifies recurring themes in her work, such as the natural world, and mountains fused with human figures. He also mentions her transition from drawing to painting which, in his opinion, strengthened her and helped her to develop her own ideas with no regrets.    

Annotations

The Venezuelan art critic Roberto Guevara (1932–98) reviews the work of the Venezuelan visual artist Corina Briceño (b. 1943) on the occasion of the exhibition Óleos y dibujos at the Galería Minotauro in 1983. In poetic yet specific, accurate terms, Guevara discusses the formal and conceptual characteristics of Briceño’s work. Referring to her early works, he describes the constant symbiosis generated by the fusion of human figures with different shapes in the natural world, a process she creates with the lines of her drawings and subtle transparencies. Turning to her second stage, Guevara mentions Briceño’s exploration of her natural, every day, familiar surroundings. These two features are representative of Briceño’s work during what are referred to as the first two stages in her art career. The first stage began in the late 1970s, and the second began in the 1980s.   

 

Briceño’s concerns and style have not changed since then, though she works in different media, sometimes making prints, sometimes making sculpture. The insights mentioned above make Guevara’s review essential reading for those who would understand Corina Briceño’s art, since it is one of the first (descriptive and analytical) references to her work. 

Researcher
Lizette Alvarez Ayesteran
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Roberto Guevara, 1983
Location
CINAP. Centro de Informacion Nacional de Artes Plásticas. Galería de Arte Nacional, Plaza Los Museos, Los Caobos, Caracas.