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  • ICAA Record ID
    1164485
    TITLE
    Introducción : del arte ingenuo al arte popular / Francisco Da Antonio
    IN
    Salón Nacional Cervecería de Oriente : Arte Ingenuo, pintura y talla populares : 15 julio al 30 septiembre 1988. -- Barcelona, Venezuela : La Cervecería, 1988
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 23-33
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Da Antonio, Francisco. "Introducción: del arte ingenuo al arte popular." In Salón Nacional Cervecería de Oriente: Arte ingenuo, pintura y talla populares: 15 de julio al 30 septiembre 1988, 23- 33. Barcelona, Venezuela: La Cervecería, 1988.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
    Aguilera Silva, Gerardo; Carvallo, Feliciano; Fernández, Antonio José, 1922-; Rivas, Bárbaro; Vargas, Rafael, 1915-
    GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In 1988, on the occasion of the Primer Salón Nacional Cervecería de Oriente: Arte ingenuo, pintura y talla populares (Barcelona, state of Anzoáteguí), critic Francisco Da Antonio ponders concepts like “naive art,” “popular art,” and “high art,” and discusses the origins of the former in the Venezuelan territory. In Da Antonio’s view, popular art encompasses all expressions of popular culture: the making of necklaces, costumes, certain musical instruments, piñatas, etc. Although also a form of popular expression, naive art falls into the category of folk art “understood as the vast universe of the traditional culture of peoples [. . .] and as an expression of their cultural and social identity.” Following an analysis of all those forms of expression, Da Antonio addresses naive art from the twentieth century, specifically the work of Bárbaro Rivas, Feliciano Carballo, Víctor Millán, Rafael Vargas, and Antonio José Fernández, among others.

Annotations

This essay by critic Francisco Da Antonio (b. 1930) examines the universe of naive art from Venezuela. It not only addresses the visual and formal issues at play in naive art, but also provides a historical perspective of it. The origins of naive art lie in what the author calls “classic art,” which he describes as an “allegedly marginal [style] found throughout the first half of the nineteenth century that makes use of points of reference taken from the reality in which artists are immersed.” In Da Antonio’s view, Juan Lovera is the best representative of naive art in Venezuela. The author also makes reference to naïve art from other countries (Cuba, Chile, and the United States), drawing parallels and pointing out differences.

Researcher
Monica Quintini
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Francisco Da Antonio, 1988
Location
CINAP. Centro de Informacion Nacional de Artes Plásticas. Galería de Arte Nacional, Plaza Los Museos, Los Caobos, Caracas.