Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    1163557
    AUTHOR
    Bernstein, Roberta
    TITLE
    Marisol / Robero Bernstein
    IN
    Marisol Retrospective Exhibition. -- Japon (New York) : The Hakone Open- Air Museum, 1995
    DESCRIPTION
    p. 12-15 : ill.
    LANGUAGES
    English
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Bernstein, Roberta. "Marisol." In Marisol Retrospective Exhibition, 12-15. Japon (New York): The Hakone Open- Air Museum, 1995.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

In this essay on sculptor Marisol [Escobar], North American curator Roberta Bernstein provides a chronological description of her work, analyzing the vast majority of her creations and the different phases of her production. She describes the characteristics of each phase and the reasons Marisol created particular works. Bernstein mentions the movements and creators that influenced Marisol’s thinking and art, and assesses her ties to different contemporary tendencies around the world, among them Pop art and Cubism.

Annotations

This text by Roberta Bernstein was featured in the catalogue to the Marisol Retrospective Exhibition held at a number of museums in Japan in 1995. The exhibition was the first major presentation of the sculptural work of Marisol [Escobar] (1930?2016), the Venezuelan-North American artist born in Paris. As the exhibition’s curator, Bernstein—a professor of art history—provides one of the most detailed texts ever written on Marisol’s production; she examines closely all of the phases of the artist’s work and addresses the influences, whether of a personal nature or related to social criticism, that informed her creation. This is one of the few texts that studies each of Marisol’s works individually. Without formulating an overall scheme, Bernstein analyzes all of Marisol’s creative periods on the basis of theme and use of form. She sheds light on the sociological and psychological backdrop manifested in the artist’s work. The essay looks to important sources on Marisol’s art to devise a complex critical apparatus, among them texts by Clara Diament de Sujo (“Itinerario de Marisol,” XXXIV Biennale di Venezia, 1968) [see ICAA digital archive (doc. no. 1163573)], by Leon Shulman (“Marisol,” Worcester Art Museum, 1971) and by John Loring (“Marisol Draws,” Arts Magazine, March 1975). Though essential to understanding the artist’s life and to in-depth and objective study of her work, this text by Bernstein has not been translated into Spanish.

Researcher
Juan Carlos Azpurua
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Location
CINAP. Centro de Informacion Nacional de Artes Plásticas. Galería de Arte Nacional, Plaza Los Museos, Los Caobos, Caracas.