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  • ICAA Record ID
    1161491
    TITLE
    Aproximación a un dibujo escrito / Calzadilla, Juan
    IN
    Juan Calzadilla : fragmentos para un magma. -- Caracas, Venezuela : Galería Blasini, 1998
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Essays
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Calzadilla, Juan. "Aproximación a un dibujo escrito." In Juan Calzadilla: fragmentos para un magma. Caracas, Venezuela: Galería Blasini, 1998.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
Synopsis

In this essay, the artist and critic Juan Calzadilla reviews his own creative process and his work. He explains the connection between drawing and writing in his work, referring to drawing as a form of “visual writing” consisting of “significant images.” He mentions the relationship between drawing and handwriting, and lists the indispensable tools required for drawing: paper, pencil, paintbrush, inks, and dropper. Calzadilla expresses his idea of “drawing” by identifying certain aspects of the term, and explains that his work is closer to what a writer does with his “handwriting method.”  

Annotations

In this essay the Venezuelan artist and critic Juan Calzadilla (b. 1931) reviews his own work in the wake of the exhibition Fragmentos para un magma (Caracas: Galería Leo Blasini, 1998). His long art career and experience as a critic equip him to take a comprehensive and penetrating view of his own drawing in conceptual, creative, formal, and technical terms. He explains how to distinguish drawing as a “simple auxiliary technique” from drawing as an “autonomous expression.”  

 

In view of the fact that drawing has always been seen as an auxiliary technique (that lays the groundwork for other expressions such as painting and sculpture)—and since Calzadilla was the author of some of the most important writings about drawing in Venezuela [see: Calzadilla, “El dibujo hoy,” in Compendio visual de las artes plásticas en Venezuela (1982) [ICAA digital archive (doc. no. 1169585)]—the text is especially important because, in addition to reviewing certain works, it is the essential referent for the perception of drawing as an “autonomous artistic expression,” and for its rehabilitation in opposition to academic tradition that considers it an “auxiliary technique.”

Researcher
Lizette Álvarez Ayesteran
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Reproduced with permission of Juan Calzadilla, Caracas, Venezuela
Location
Biblioteca Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Caracas