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  • ICAA Record ID
    1159514
    AUTHOR
    Lucena, Luis Fernando
    TITLE
    [La gran virtud de Gego...] / Luis Fernando Lucena
    IN
    Litografías de Gego. --- Bogotá, Colombia : Galería Ud., 1968
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Book/pamphlet article – Reviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    800x600

    Lucena, Luis Fernando. “[La gran virtud de Gego...].” In Litografías de Gego. Bogotá, Colombia: Galería Ud., 1968.

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Synopsis

Luis Fernando Lucena reviews Gego’s lithographic works. The Colombian writer describes these works by Gego as atemporal and in a permanent state of activity, with no beginning or end. He also suggests that it is impossible and unnecessary to attempt to classify this artist’s work.

Annotations

This very brief review by the Colombian writer Luis Fernando Lucena (b. 1943) reports on the exhibition Litografías de Gego [Lithographs by Gego] at the Galería Ud. in Bogotá, which he cofounded in 1967 with Matilde de Lewental, Clemencia de Lucena, and Raúl Marroquín. One of this gallery’s goals was to provide exhibition space for artists from other countries, as happened in the case of the lithographs produced by the German-born Venezuelan artist Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt, 1912–1994), in 1968, barely a year after they were created.

 

In his review, Lucena describes Gego’s work as being removed from the Kinetic movement; this was a frequent mistake in those days, one that surfaces to this day in opinions voiced by certain critics. Also of interest is the reviewer’s initial perception of Gego’s work as having no beginning and no end, an idea that was widely explored much later on, and that became a central theme in critical studies of her signature work, the Reticulárea (1969).

Researcher
Josefina Manrique
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Luis Fernando Lucena, 1968