Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art

www.mfah.org Home

IcaadocsArchive

Document first page thumbnail
  • ICAA Record ID
    1159272
    TITLE
    La obra escultórica de Gego : esqueletos de ideas y canto a la forma / F. Gil Tovar
    IN
    El Tiempo : Suplemento literario (Bogotá, Colombia). -- Jun. 25, 1967
    DESCRIPTION
    ill.
    LANGUAGES
    Spanish
    TYPE AND GENRE
    Newspaper article – Reviews
    BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION
    Gil Tovar, F. “La obra escultórica de Gego: Esqueletos de ideas y canto a la forma.” El Tiempo: Suplemento literario (Bogotá, Colombia), June 25, 1967.
    TOPIC DESCRIPTORS
    NAME DESCRIPTORS
Editorial Categories [?]
Synopsis

In this newspaper article, F. Gil Tovar describes Gego’s work as being representative of one of the two types of German art. In the critic’s view, Gego’s work is driven as much by concept as by logic (as opposed to Romanticism, the other type of German art), and describes it as spatial art influenced by geometry, though not lacking in poetry. Gil Tovar claims that Gego’s drawings in the air suggest volume and allude to relationships and to time.

Annotations

The Colombian critic and art historian F. Gil Tovar wrote this article about the German-born Venezuelan artist Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt, 1912–1994) on the occasion of her exhibition Gego: Esculturas, 1957­–1967 [Gego: Sculpture, 1957–1967] at the Luis Ángel Arango Library in Bogotá in 1967. As the name implies, the exhibition consisted of three-dimensional works (made with rigid materials) from Gego’s earliest period, which revealed her extensive experimentation with geometry and her use of parallel lines. The exhibition was shown at the Galería Conkright earlier that year.

 

Notwithstanding Gil Tovar’s classification of Gego’s work within one of two German art movements, the search for signs of German culture and visual art in her work has prompted a great deal of speculation among critics, particularly in recent critical appraisals of her work that could quite legitimately identify this article as a harbinger of things to come. One example of this can be seen in the essay by Hannah Feldman, “On Not Being Venezuelan” in the catalogue for the exhibition: Gego 1957–1988: Thinking the Line. (Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2006). This is the basis of an ongoing argument between those who see Gego’s work as an undeniable product of her life in Venezuela, and those who believe that her work is fundamentally influenced by the German and European avant-garde.

 

On the other hand, Gil Tovar’s article refers to certain aspects of Gego’s work—such as the virtual volume of her works and the relationships that they suggest, among others—which would be fertile ground for future critical reviews.  

Researcher
Josefina Manrique
Team
Fundación Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela
Credit
Francisco Gil Tovar, 1967